Essays

Transcendentalism: In The 19th Century

Transcendentalism revealed itself in the beginning of the 19th century with talented writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman. These well-educated men brought such ideas as individualism, imagination, and nature to life through their works. Many writers in the transcendentalism period included such characteristics in their pieces. Some of the characteristics are spiritual well being, individualism, nature, and imagination. There are some that make these characteristics more evident than others are such as, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, I Sit and Look Out by Walt…

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Essays

Works Literature, what is it

Well, the glossary of our handy fifth edition of Intro to Reading and Writing states that it is a written or oral composition that tells stories, dramatize situations, express emotion and analyzes and advocates ideas. How does the author accomplish all this? By using tools like plot, setting, characters, and their very own tone and style. Some authors write and base their works on passed events that at one time or another happened to them. Others though have to use their imagination and that makes things more complicated, because he…

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Essays

The Wife of Bath: Feminism in Chaucer

Women in the medieval times were cast into very distinct roles. There was a strict code of conduct that was followed. They were to be submissive to their husbands and follow their lead. A woman’s place was also in the home and the responsibilities of cooking, cleaning, sewing, etc. fell into their domain. Women who deviated from these cultural-set norms made for interesting characters. Chaucer’s use of women and their overstepping their boundaries and typical roles in society make them most memorable. Most of the gender expectations stemmed from the…

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Essays

Dream Versus Reality: Setting and Atmosphere in James Joyce’s “Araby”

Convinced that the Dublin of the 1900’s was a center of spiri-tual paralysis, James Joyce loosely but thematically tied together hisstories in Dubliners by means of their common setting. Each of thestories consists of a portrait in which Dublin contributes in some wayto the dehumanizing experience of modem life. The boy in the story”Araby” is intensely subject to the city’s dark, hopeless conformity,and his tragic yearning toward the exotic in the face of drab, uglyreality forms the center of the story. On its simplest level, “Araby” is a story about…

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Essays

Measure for Measure, the last of Shakespeare’s great comedies

Measure for Measure, the last of Shakespeare’s great comedies, is also the darkest of his comedies, and represents his transition to tragic plays. This play differs from Shakespeare’s other comedies, and is in many ways more akin to tragedy than to comedy. In setting, plot, and character development Measure for Measure has a tragic tone, however, because none of the main characters actually loses his life, the play is a comedy. Almost all of Shakespeare’s comedies have dual localities: the real world of crime, punishment, and responsibility, and an idyllic…

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Essays

Comparing Catcher in the Rye and Pygmalion and the Themes

They Represent In J. D. Salingers novel The Catcher in the Rye, the main character, Holden Caulfield, muses at one point on the possibility of escaping from the world of confusion and phonies while George Bernard Shaws main character of Pygmalion, Eliza Dolittle, struggles to become a phony. The possible reason for this is that they both come from opposite backgrounds. Holden is a young, affluent teenager in 1950s America who resents materialism and Eliza Dolittle is a young, indigent woman who is living in Britain during the late 1800s…

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Essays

Biblical Allusion In Cry, The Beloved Country

The use of Biblical allusions and references is evident in Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country. Against the backdrop of South Africa’s racial and cultural problems, massive enforced segregation, similarly enforced economic inequality, Alan Paton uses these references as way to preserve his faith for the struggling country. By incorporating Biblical references into his novel, one can see that Alan Paton is a religious man and feels that faith will give hope to his beloved country. Throughout the entire novel, Alan Paton continuously uses references to the bible and while…

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Essays

Symbolism in the Chrysanthemums

At first glance John Steinbecks \”The Chrysanthemums\” seems to be a story about a woman whose niche is in the garden. Upon deeper inspection the story has strong notes of feminism in the central character Elisa Allen. Elisas actions and feelings reflect her struggle as a woman trying and failing to emasculate herself in a male dominated society. Elisa is at her strongest and most proud in the garden and becomes weak when placed in feminine positions such as going out to dinner with her husband. Steinbeck smartly narrates this…

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Essays

A Worn Path By Eudora Welty

In A Worn Path Eudora Weltys plot is not all that clear in the beginning of her short story, but progresses as her character carries on against all of the overwhelming forces against her. In this short story a black elderly woman, Phoenix Jackson, must overcome the odds against her as she valiantly travels through many obstacles in order to contribute to the wellness of her grandson, for whom she is making this trip down a worn path. It is at this point that all of Weltys readers hearts open…

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Essays

The story “Neighbors”

In the story “Neighbors”, a man and a woman’s true nature is revealed when nobody is watching. Bill and Arlene Miller are introduced as a normal, “happy,” middle class married couple, but they feel less important than their friends Harriet and Jim Stone, who live in the apartment across the hall. The Miller’s perceive the Stone’s to have a better and more eventful life. The Stones get to travel often because o Jim’s job, leaving their ca and plants n the care of the Millers. When the Stones leave on…

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Essays

Suffering In Crime And Punishment

In the novel Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky, suffering is an integral part of every character’s role. However, the message that Dostoevsky wants to present with the main character, Raskolnikov, is not one of the Christian idea of salvation through suffering. Rather, it appears to me, as if the author never lets his main character suffer mentally throughout the novel, in relation to the crime, that is. His only pain seems to be physical sicknes. Raskolnikov commits a premeditated murder in a state of delirium. He ends up committing…

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Essays

The Road Not Taken Analysis

Everyone is a traveler, choosing the roads to follow on the map of their continuous life. A straight path never leaves speaker with one sole direction on which to travel. Robert Frosts poem “The Road Not Taken” is about how the choices affect speakers life. Frost illustrates speaker to make a difficult decision about choosing one of two equally promising roads to travel on. When speaker comes to a fork road, a decision needs to be made. Both paths are different and choosing the right one will depend on his…

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Essays

A Child Called It Story Analysis

A Child Called It is the story of a young boy who, in order to survive, must triumph over the physical, emotional, and medical abuse created by his mother. The exploitation of alcohol plays an important role in the abuse by the mother and the neglect to see and the courage to intervene the problems by Daves father. Dave considered the abuse he endured by his mother, games. But he always tried to be one small step ahead of her. Like Death From Child Abuse . . . And No…

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Essays

William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar: The Role of Minor Conspirators

In the course of time, the world has seen an abundance of influential men. Oftentimes, however, the forces behind these men remain unseen. This is shown in William Shakespeares Julius Caesar by the supporting role the minor conspirators have on the major conspirators. Just as women often embolden powerful men of society, the minor conspirators embolden the major conspirators greatly affecting the outcome of the play. One of the most important minor conspirators of the play is Decius, who was responsible for bringing Caesar to the capitol on the day…

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Essays

The Price of Perfection in Brave New World

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World presents a portrait of a society which is superficially a perfect world. At first inspection, it seems perfect in many ways: it is carefree, problem free and depression free. All aspects of the population are controlled: number, social class, and intellectual ability are all carefully regulated. Even history is controlled and rewritten to meet the needs of the party. Stability must be maintained at all costs. In the new world which Huxley creates, if there is even a hint of anger, the wonder drug Soma…

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Essays

The Alembic of Art chapter of My Antonia The Road Home

The Alembic of Art is the chapter of My Antonia The Road Home that will be discussed. This chapter suggests that Willa Cather uses references from the arts in creating the novel My Antonia. Much of Willa Cather’s background came from her childhood in Nebraska. It even uprooted the character Annie Sadilek, from Red Cloud, a town Cather lived in during her adolescence (“Classic Notes”, 1). Despite her background, John J. Murphy believes “My Antonia is a novel in which vision and arrangement create character” (Murphy, 37) and Cather created…

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Essays

The Catcher In The Rye: Holdens Insight About Life

The book Catcher in the Rye tells of Holden Caulfield’s insight about life and the world around him. Holden shares many of his opinions about people and leads the reader on a 5 day visit into his mind. Holden, throughout the book, made other people feel inferior to his own. I can relate to this because although I do not view people inferior to myself, I do judge others unequally. Holden and I both have similar judgements of people from the way they act and behave. We also share feelings…

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Essays

Paradise Lost Contrasting Styles

In the excerpts from John Milton’s Paradise Lost, the reader can see the various elements of style Milton uses to achieve two different effects. His diction produces a brutal tone in Passage A, while painting an idyllic picture in Passage B. Milton’s sentence structure supports his diction. The syntax of Passage A is sharp, while Passage B’s is more flowing. Figurative language, especially conceit, is pervasive throughout both passages, and the poetic devices – mainly hyperbole – add to the overall effect of the passages. The two passages influence the…

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Essays

Comparison Between Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451

For more than half a century science fiction writers have thrilled and challenged readers with visions of the future and future worlds. These authors offered an insight into what they expected man, society, and life to be like at some future time. One such author, Ray Bradbury, utilized this concept in his work, Fahrenheit 451, a futuristic look at a man and his role in society. Bradbury utilizes the luxuries of life in America today, in addition to various occupations and technological advances, to show what life could be like…

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Essays

Hamlet as an enigmatic standout

Of all of Shakespeares characters that I have studied thus far, Hamlet is an enigmatic standout. The complexity of so intriguing a character as Hamlet commends the immense skill of Shakespeare to create characters that seem almost more real and believable than people we meet daily. It is doubtful that many others could combine the eloquence and wit that emanates from the character of Hamlet, who captivates his audience with such charming presence. In a grand display of his linguistic capabilities, Hamlet delivers the passage: I will tell you why;…

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