Essays

Analytical View Of James Joyces’ Araby

Viewpoints from which stories are written are used to enhance the overall point a story is making. James Joyces Araby is no exception. Narrated by a young boy of about twelve or thirteen, it depicts his personal coming of age. The usage of a first person narration allows the reader to see things the way the boy sees them; be as innocent and wistful as he is, thus feeling the incredible intensity of his eventual realization. In addition to this coming of age theme, intricately woven throughout are hints to…

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Essays

Dream Versus Reality: Setting and Atmosphere in James Joyce’s “Araby”

Convinced that the Dublin of the 1900’s was a center of spiri-tual paralysis, James Joyce loosely but thematically tied together hisstories in Dubliners by means of their common setting. Each of thestories consists of a portrait in which Dublin contributes in some wayto the dehumanizing experience of modem life. The boy in the story”Araby” is intensely subject to the city’s dark, hopeless conformity,and his tragic yearning toward the exotic in the face of drab, uglyreality forms the center of the story. On its simplest level, “Araby” is a story about…

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Essays

The short story “Araby” by James Joyce

The short story “Araby” by James Joyce could very well be described as a deep poem written in prose. Read casually, it seems all but incomprehensible, nothing more than a series of depressing impressions and memories thrown together in a jumble and somehow meant to depict a childhood infatuation. Like the sweet milk inside a coconut, the pleasure of this story comes only to the reader who is willing to put forth the intense effort necessary to comprehend it. Or like an onion, peeling off one layer reveals yet another…

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Essays

Dubliners by James Joyce

A collection of short stories published in 1907, Dubliners, by James Joyce, revolves around the everyday lives of ordinary citizens in Dublin, Ireland (Freidrich 166). According to Joyce himself, his intention was to write a chapter of the moral history of [his] country and [he] chose Dublin for the scene because the city seemed to [b]e the centre of paralysis (Friedrich 166). True to his goal, each of the fifteen stories are tales of disappointment, darkness, captivity, frustration, and flaw. The book is divided into four sections: childhood, adolescence, maturity,…

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Essays

Araby: How the Setting Reinforces the Theme and Characters

The setting in “Araby” reinforces the theme and the characters by using imagery of light and darkness. The experiences of the boy in James Joyce’s “Araby” illustrate how people often expect more than ordinary reality can provide and then feel disillusioned and disappointed. The author uses dark and obscure references to make the boy’s reality of living in the gloomy town of Araby more vivid. He uses dark and gloomy references to create the mood or atmosphere, then changes to bright light references when discussing Mangan’s sister. The story expresses…

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Essays

Religion in James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Religion is an important and recurring theme in James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Through his experiences with religion, Stephen Dedalus both matures and progressively becomes more individualistic as he grows. Though reared in a Catholic school, several key events lead Stephen to throw off the yoke of conformity and choose his own life, the life of an artist. Religion is central to the life of Stephen Dedalus the child. He was reared in a strict, if not harmonious, Catholic family. The severity of his…

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Essays

James Joyce Essay

In the opening of the story, James Joyce carefully described the protagonists neighborhood and surroundings in two paragraphs. As he used real names like North Richmond Street and Christian brothers School, thus by reading the first paragraph, readers are able to figure out a map of the community in which the protagonist lived. Then he went on to lead us to the late priests drawing room. The detailed description of the room appealed to our senses. Following the footsteps of the protagonist, the readers can smell the musty air of…

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Essays

The Dubliners by Joyce

Writing enables James Joyce the power to belittle not only Dublin, but to express his lack of affiliation with the Catholic Church. In Dubliners, Joyce paints the picture of a town filled with greed, both sexually and financially. He takes the definition of religion and turns it on itself. Joyce shows no mercy on his path to ridicule Dublins pride and historical roots. In a number of the stories Joyce depicts man as an infection in Dublin. Most of the time men will be at fault or the root of…

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Essays

James Joyce’s Dubliners – Lack of Insight in Araby

Readers of “Araby” often focus on the final scene as the key to the story. They assume the boy experiences some profound insight about himself when he gazes “up into the darkness.” I believe, however, that the boy sees nothing and learns nothing–either about himself or others. He’s not self- reflective; he’s merely self-absorbed. The evidence supporting this interpretation is the imagery of blindness and the ironic point of view of the narrator. There can seem to be a profound insight at the end of the story only if we…

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