Essays

The Price of Perfection in Brave New World

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World presents a portrait of a society which is superficially a perfect world. At first inspection, it seems perfect in many ways: it is carefree, problem free and depression free. All aspects of the population are controlled: number, social class, and intellectual ability are all carefully regulated. Even history is controlled and rewritten to meet the needs of the party. Stability must be maintained at all costs. In the new world which Huxley creates, if there is even a hint of anger, the wonder drug Soma…

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Essays

Comparison Between Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451

For more than half a century science fiction writers have thrilled and challenged readers with visions of the future and future worlds. These authors offered an insight into what they expected man, society, and life to be like at some future time. One such author, Ray Bradbury, utilized this concept in his work, Fahrenheit 451, a futuristic look at a man and his role in society. Bradbury utilizes the luxuries of life in America today, in addition to various occupations and technological advances, to show what life could be like…

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Essays

Brave New World – Compared to Modern Society

In many cases when you read a novel you may find comparisons between the “fictional” society and your realistic one. The author may concsciously or unconsciously create similarities between these two worlds. The novelist can forsee the future and write according to this vision. In Brave New World, Adlous Huxley evnsions the future of our society and the dangeroud direction it is headed in. Brave New World is greatly dependant upon soma, as in our world where prescribed drugs and drug abuse are prominent. This is evident when Bernard and…

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Essays

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Analysis

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a novel that takes place in Utopia. Yet in this ideal place everyone is conditioned to be happy, it is a place where various things such as the arts are restricted so all people will be synchronized in thinking. Love and commitment does not exist but rather everyone belongs to everyone else. This place is also a place where soma holidays help people escape from their realities and never have its society feel any kind of distress or illness. This place was not…

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Essays

The Future as Portrayed in Brave New World

Aldous Huxleys Brave New World opens in a technically advanced future world. In the beginning of this book, we see the Director of World Hatcheries lead the new hatchery students on a tour of a Conditioning Center in London where babies are produced in bottles and pre-sorted to determine which class level they will be born into. These class level range from Alpha-plus, the highest level, to Epsilon-minus, the lowest. There are no parents, and babies are conditioned from birth to learn certain behaviors. All diseases have been eliminated, and…

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Essays

Story Summary of Brave New World

Brave New World opens in the Central London Hatching and Conditioning Center, where the Director of the Hatchery and Henry Foster are giving a tour to a group of boys. The boys learn about the Bokanovsky Process, which allows the Hatchery to produce thousands of nearly identical human embryos. During the gestation period the embryos travel in bottles along a conveyor belt through a large factory building, and are conditioned to belong to one of five castes: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, or Epsilon. The Alpha embryos are destined to become…

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Essays

Brave New World Summary

The novel opens in the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre. The year is a. f. 632 (632 years “after Ford”). The Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning is giving a group of students a tour of a factory that produces human beings and conditions them for their predestined roles in the World State. He explains to the boys that human beings no longer produce living offspring. Instead, surgically removed ovaries produce ova that are fertilized in artificial receptacles and incubated in specially designed bottles. The Hatchery destines each fetus for…

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Essays

A Comparison of This Perfect Day, Brave New World, and 1984

This Perfect Day belongs to the genre of “dystopian” or anti-utopian novels, like Huxley’s Brave New World and Orwell’s 1984. Yet it is more satisfying than either. This Perfect Day is probably Ira Levin’s greatest work of his career. Levin’s work, despite being written in 1970, is very plausible having realistic technology, such as scanners and computers which watch over the entire family, the entire population of the world. This novel could be used to show the dangers of a Utopian society as well as being full of anti-Communist and…

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Essays

Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

As man has progressed through the ages, there has been essentially one purpose. That purpose is to arrive at a utopian society, where everyone is happy, disease is nonexistent, and strife, anger, or sadness are unheard of. Only happiness exists. But when confronted with Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, we come to realize that this is not, in fact, what the human soul really craves. In fact, Utopian societies are much worse than those of today. In a utopian society, the individual, who among others composes the society, is lost…

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Essays

Brave New World by Huxley

Chapter 1 Summary: The novel is set six hundred years in the future. The world has submitted to domination by World Controllers, whose primary goal is to ensure the stability and happiness of society. Thus the underlying principle of the regime is utilitarianism, or maximizing the overall happiness of the society. The novel begins at the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Center, a production factory for human beings. A group of students is being given a tour of the facilities by the Director. The students are introduced to various machines…

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Essays

Postman’s Analysis of Brave New World

As analyzed by social critic Neil Postman, Huxley’s vision of the future, portrayed in the novel Brave New World, holds far more relevance to present day society than that of Orwell’s classic 1984. Huxley’s vision was simple: it was a vision of a trivial society, drowned in a sea of pleasure and ignorant of knowledge and pain, slightly resembling the world of today. In society today, knowledge is no longer appreciated as it has been in past cultures, in turn causing a deficiency in intelligence and will to learn. Also,…

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Essays

Comparison and Contrast between Brave New World and Handmaid’s Tale

The government in Huxley’s Brave New World and Atwood’s Handmaid’s Tale, both use different methods of obtaining control over individuals, but are both similar in the fact that humans are looked at as instruments. Human’s bodies, in both novels, are looked at as objects and not directly as living things with feelings. In both societies the individuals have very little and are controlled strictly by the government. In Handmaid’s Tale and Brave New World, through issues of employment, class systems, and the control of reproduction, Atwood and Huxley forewarn that…

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Essays

Huxleys Brave New World

The ideas presented in Huxleys Brave New World are expressed as fundamental principles of utopia, which could be achieved by classism. However, living in a so-called utopia, comes with a price. In this society, every beings destiny is planned out while they are still in their bottles. Depending on their caste, each person has his or her clearly defined role. Community, Identity and Stability is the motto and prime goal of Huxleys utopia. This goal can only be achieved by having a society divided into five caste social groups, because…

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